teamlongbeach:

Fureigh, Molly, and Dan love Long Beach!

teamlongbeach:

Fureigh, Molly, and Dan love Long Beach!

8 notes

codeforamerica:

From the Brigade forum:

Hi Martha,

Hope it went well! Sounds like you got a lot of great advice already. +1 to Shawn’s advice about finding out what kind of data people were interested in and Frank’s comment about having real problems to work on.
Here are a few other things I think help…

6 notes

Cyber Attack

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(CNN) — Internet users around the globe were facing slowed down service thanks to what’s being called the biggest cyber attack in history.

The prolonged denial-of-service assault is targeting The Spamhaus Project, a European spam-fighting group that has gone after CyberBunker, a data-storage company that offers to host any content “except child porn and anything related to terrorism.”

The organization has been in a long-running feud withCyberBunker and claims spammers use it as a host from which to spray junk mail across the Web.

Read More

vividtimes:

A new GPS device for bike owners has just launched on Kickstarter, called The BikeSpike. If you’ve ever had your bicycle stolen, you’re probably familiar with the frustration of losing your two-wheeled mode of transport. A Chicago- based startup is addressing that pain point with a gadget that alerts your smartphone when your bike is tampered with and makes it easy to notify the police.

(via vividtimes.com)

45 notes

guardian:

On the seventh birthday of the earliest version of Twitter we’ve been taking a look at our coverage of the platform as it started to emerge. The earliest article we can find which mentions Twitter is on a Comment is Free piece on 28 November 2006 by  where he writes amusingly:

For the ultimate in solipsism, check out twitter.com, a site where you can answer the question, “What are you doing?” At 7:47 am on Monday, for example, Lynda was going to get a glass of cold water. This raises more questions. Did she get it? Was it cold enough? Tragically, we won’t know until someone starts a site about what you were doing before what you’re doing now. Or a site about what you are going to do after you finish what you’re doing now. There could be multiple options. People could vote. Someone call Google. We’re rich! 

Then there’s the Bobbie Johnson piece pictured above comparing Twitter to MySpace written on 16 March 2007 and this piece Bobbie wrote just the day before on 15 March 2007 has another smirk-inducing quote:

The rapid-fire model may be superseded when internet access become ubiquitous, but right now Twitterers have found that a quick text message does the trick for them. It’s even been the medium of choice for some breaking news announcements.

If only we had known back then what we do now…

95 notes


Chrome Experiment turns any website into a playable marble maze
Google is having some fun showing off what Chrome can do — the company today released a new Chrome Experiment that transforms websites into a playable marble maze. World Wide Maze breaks down the elements of a webpage, and uses them to create a floating obstacle course for you to navigate a rolling ball through by tilting your smartphone. The experiment wirelessly syncs Chrome on a desktop with Chrome on a mobile device, displaying the game on the larger screen and using the mobile device as a controller.


Chrome Experiment turns any website into a playable marble maze

Google is having some fun showing off what Chrome can do — the company today released a new Chrome Experiment that transforms websites into a playable marble maze. World Wide Maze breaks down the elements of a webpage, and uses them to create a floating obstacle course for you to navigate a rolling ball through by tilting your smartphone. The experiment wirelessly syncs Chrome on a desktop with Chrome on a mobile device, displaying the game on the larger screen and using the mobile device as a controller.

178 notes

Wireless ‘under the skin’ prototype

A new blood-testing subdermal sensor has been developed by a team of scientists in Switzerland. While that may not sound particularly notable, this half-inch prototype can instantly beam several health metrics to smart devices over Bluetooth, monitoring cholesterol, blood sugar levels as well as the impact of medical treatments like chemotherapy using five built-in sensors.

The device has already been tested on animals and while the researchers hope to begin testing soon on patients that would typically require a lot of blood tests and monitoring, the module is still several years from a commercial release. According to the EPFL's video, the sensor can even predict heart attacks several hours before they occur, sensing minute changes in the bloodstream ahead of time. We've 'implanted' the explanation after the break, but if you're looking for some more medical-minded specifics, head to the source.

cloudquays:

9 Trends To Watch For In Wearable Tech
GigaOM - With advances in sensors and wireless, the age of wearable tech is swiftly approaching. Christian Lindholm, of design firm Koru, explains the trends his firm is tracking.
The wearables business is gaining momentum and is one of the most exciting markets of the digital age. We at Koru decided to share some of the key trends we believe will emerge this year. To quote Gary Hamel, a hero of mine: today’s niche markets are tomorrow’s mass markets. Read more »

cloudquays:

9 Trends To Watch For In Wearable Tech

GigaOM - With advances in sensors and wireless, the age of wearable tech is swiftly approaching. Christian Lindholm, of design firm Koru, explains the trends his firm is tracking.

The wearables business is gaining momentum and is one of the most exciting markets of the digital age. We at Koru decided to share some of the key trends we believe will emerge this year. To quote Gary Hamel, a hero of mine: today’s niche markets are tomorrow’s mass markets. Read more »

2 notes

Technology meets fashion

Technology meets fashion

4 notes